Skip to content

Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (60)

Früher auf Kulturtechno:
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (2)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (3)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (4)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (5)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (6)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (7)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (8)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (9)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (10)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (11)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (12)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (13)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (14)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (15)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (16)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (17)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (18)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (19)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (20)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (21)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (22)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (23)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (24)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (25)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (26)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (27)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (28)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (29)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (30)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (31)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (32)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (33)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (34)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (35)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (36)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (37)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (38)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (39)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (40)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (41)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (42)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (43)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (44)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (45)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (46)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (47)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (48)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (49)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (50)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (51)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (52)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (53)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (54)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (55)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (56)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (57)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (58)
Musizierende Tiere (im Mittelalter) (59)

Barcode Scratching

Scheint ein veritables neues Genre zu werden.

Tokyo-based musician Ei Wada and his band, Electronicos Fantasticos, are known for upcycling old electric appliances (e.g., TVs, fans, and now a barcode scanner) into musical instruments. Here they test out their scratching „barcode-board,“ which consists of a humongous barcode reader and a skateboard outfitted with an attached scanner. He says „the signal is transmitted wirelessly to the speaker instead of a cash register,“ according to his YouTube page (and translated on Google).

(via BoingBoing)

Ice sounds

Wie Entenkükenfüßchen auf verschiedenen Böden klingen

#künstlerische Forschung

derweil auf Twitter

Im Bett Klavier spielen

How the oil industry accidentally created autotune

Wenn man genauer hinhört, merkt man’s.

Dr. Andy Hildebrand invented the original Antares Autotune software („Autotune“ is one of those proprietary eponyms like Kleenex or Jacuzzi; other pitch correction softwares don’t call themselves autotune, but people often still refer to them as such, and they use the same basic principles). A classic flutist by training, Dr. Hildebrand ended up working for Exxon Production Research for a while. It was there that he helped to develop a software to process data from reflection seismology—that is, using seismic waves to determine whether or not there might be any oil or other substances worth drilling/fracking/mining for.

(via BoingBoing)

Wenn Komponisten in deiner Schulklasse wären

Die Geschichte der Mini-Schallplatte

This Techmoan video looks into a little-known record format from the 1960s, the under-4″ 45 RPM flexi-disc known as a Hip Pocket Record or a Pocket Disc. The format was an attempt at targeting the growing young teen market but it never gained a sustainable consumer base.

(via BoingBoing)

Popmusik